• A
  • A
  • A
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • ABC
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
  • А
Regular version of the site

News

Mutual perceptions of migrants and hosts: a cross-regional analysis

Olga Verbilovitch is a member of the Socio-Cultural Research Laboratory and a graduate student at the Department of Sociology. Olga presented her qualitative study of mutual perceptions of Russians and North-Caucasians. 

A paper presented at the “Culture Matters” seminar on February, 20.
Olga Verbilovitch is a member of the Socio-Cultural Research Laboratory and a graduate student at the Department of Sociology.
Olga presented her qualitative study of mutual perceptions of Russians and North-Caucasians. The study aimed at identifying key factors shaping such perceptions, with special attention paid to regional specifics.
16 focus groups were conducted in Moscow and Stavropol (NCFD), with 5 to 10 participants each. 
The following factors influencing mutual perceptions were identified in the focus groups: 1) demographic characteristics: migrants perceived older women as conflict-prone, while the locals identified younger males as a risk group; 2) personal characteristics: both groups highly values education and good manners, but migrants were expected to be socially active and willing to change, while migrants expected hosts to be tolerant, friendly, and critically thinking; 3) attitudes towards migration: perceived motivation and causes for migration, expectations of migration outcomes, cautiousness; 4) social-psychological and ethnopsychological characteristics: ethnic patriotism, perceived discrimination, integration strategies, et c.
Cultural differences mentioned by respondents were: collectivistic/individualistic values (nature of social support, collective decision-making), traditionalism, decision-making strategies and fashion choices.
A significant factor shaping mutual perceptions was the context of interaction situations: the history of interaction, socioeconomic group standing, the degree of trust towards local government, presence or absence of opportunities for dialogue.
Olga concluded her presentation with methodological considerations. She described the difficulties that the research group faced while trying to arrange focus-groups with North Caucasian participants and suggested dyads and triads as a more efficient way to gather quality data.